Category Archives: Physics

Unpolarized single-photon generation with true randomness from diamond

The Tohoku University research group of Professor Keiichi Edamatsu and Postdoctoral fellow Naofumi Abe has demonstrated dynamically and statically unpolarized single-photon generation using diamond. This result is expected to play…

OLYMPUS experiment sheds light on structure of protons

Seven-year study indicates two photons, not one, are exchanged in electron-proton interactions. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A mystery concerning the structure of protons is a step closer to being solved, thanks to…

Stars align in test supporting “spooky action at a distance”

Physicists address loophole in tests of Bell’s inequality, using 600-year-old starlight. CAMBRIDGE, MA — Quantum entanglement may appear to be closer to science fiction than anything in our physical reality….

UW-Madison astrophysics innovator Lawler wins national award

James Lawler, a University of Wisconsin–Madison professor of physics known for devising innovative techniques to measure the chemical elements in the sun and other stars, has been named the recipient…

CERN experiment reports sixfold improved measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton

In a paper published today in the journal Nature Communications, the BASE collaboration at CERN reports the most precise measurement ever made of the magnetic moment of the antiproton, allowing a fundamental comparison between matter and antimatter.

Scientists set traps for atoms with single-particle precision

Atoms, photons, and other quantum particles are often capricious and finicky by nature; very rarely at a standstill, they often collide with others of their kind. But if such particles can be individually corralled and controlled in large numbers, they may be harnessed as quantum bits, or qubits — tiny units of information whose state or orientation can be used to carry out calculations at rates significantly faster than today’s semiconductor-based computer chips.

A marriage made in sunlight: Invention merges solar with liquid battery

Song Jin, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has a better idea: integrating the solar cell with a large-capacity battery. He and his colleagues have made a single device that eliminates the usual intermediate step of making electricity and, instead, transfers the energy directly to the battery’s electrolyte.

Electronic circuits printed at 1 micron resolution

A research team consisting of a group from National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA) and Colloidal Ink developed a printing technique for forming electronic circuits and thin-film transistors (TFTs) with line width and line spacing both being 1 μm. This study was supported by a Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development from NEDO.

Pushing through sand

For those of you who take sandcastle building very seriously, listen up: MIT engineers now say you can trust a very simple equation to calculate the force required to push a shovel — and any other “intruder”— through sand. The team also found that the same concept, known as the resistive force theory, can generate useful equations for cohesive materials like muds.

Study reveals new physics of how fluids flow in porous media

One of the most promising approaches to curbing the flow of human-made greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is to capture these gases at major sources, such as fossil-fuel-burning power plants, and then inject them into deep, water-saturated rocks where they can remain stably trapped for centuries or millennia.

This is just one example of fluid-fluid displacement in a porous material, which also applies to a wide variety of natural and industrial processes — for example, when rainwater penetrates into soil by displacing air, or when oil recovery is enhanced by displacing the oil with injected water.